Thursday, July 24, 2014

TBT Guest Review of The Pearl by John Steinbeck


Review by Kim@CoziNest 
http://www.cozinest.net   
A Mexican Indian family is struck with calamity when a scorpion stings their young son. In order to pay a doctor to treat their son, the father, Kino, goes diving for pearls and finds the “pearl of the world.” The events that follow reveal corruption, greed and covetousness within the town village.

My ninth grade Literature teacher read this book aloud to our class and we followed along with individual copies. Mrs. Robinson kept the books in her classroom and handed them out only when she planned to read. I remember praying before each class that she would read that day.

There were moments when my gut reaction to their perilous situation caused me to doubt my own character. I found myself wanting the family to sell the pearl for financial gain regardless of the conflict that surrounded the gem! In the end, the sorrow I felt at the conclusion of the story renewed my hope that I wasn’t such a bad person after all.

This is the first book I remember reading that taught the difference between innocence and guilt similar to a parable in the Bible. I fell in love with literature in Mrs. Robinson’s class. I would recommend this book to 7th-9th grade teachers to help children relate to good versus evil and learn how our personal choices affect lives.
Kim @ CoziNest
I am a 54 year old empty-nester who enjoys writing about 
adventures that keep me young and connected.





8 comments:

  1. I've never actually read this book and am surprised completely by this fact. It sounds wonderful. Thanks to Kim for the recommendation and fabulous description that makes this work of classic literature sound thrilling.

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    1. Compared to today's cutting edge plots in YA fiction, the classics may seem less intriguing. But then I remember they are "classics" for a reason! They never go out of style. Thanks for sharing CraftyHope!

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  2. What a nice review! I admit that I wasn't a big reader. I only read books that were required school reading and I don't have any memories of my parents reading to me at bedtime, but I do remember loving a couple of classic novels that I'm sure are on everyone's favorites list.

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  3. When people consider themselves nonreaders, I suggest they rehabilitate by going back to children's literature. Reading Charlotte's Web by E. B. White is a good place to begin! BTW, what are the classics you remember reading for school? Thanks for sharing!

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    1. To Kill a Mockingbird and The Great Gatsby were my favorites. I remember reading Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer, and of course Catcher in the Rye. We had lots of Dr Seuss books in the house growing up. Horton Hears a Who was one I remember and The Cat in The Hat. I don't have any particular memories attached to them though except that I liked the art.

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    2. Those are definitely classics. I reread "Mockingbird" and "Gatsby" over the last couple of years. They never get old. You probably know this but Harper Lee, author of TKAM, is from Monroeville, AL.

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  4. I think I've reached the age I should begin reading all the books I once read over again to remember the details. I've read the Bible through seven times and now I find myself thinking I don't remember that before. Anyway, I have always enjoyed reading and learning. The saying the more you read the more you know and the more you know the more you grow comes to mind if I T have that right. I am going to enjoy reading the review of books such as Kim's review of The Pearl by John Steinbeck on Profesor Storytime. Thanks Kim.

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    1. True Bonnie. I think we see something different in books read before because of where we are in life. It's proof that people do evolve over time. Hopefully, for the better!

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